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5 Reasons We Love (Or Hate!) Our Jobs

5 Reasons We Love (Or Hate!) Our Jobs

The road you take is up to you...

Renee Weisman | NonProfitPeople

What Can You Learn From These Results?

If you are one of the people in the “love my job” category, congratulations. Appreciate what you have, continue to learn and take on new challenges. If you are ever in a position of leadership, be the type of boss that you appreciate.

But if you’re in the “hate my job” category, is there any hope? Yes! It takes effort, patience, and commitment but there are steps you can take to make your job one worth keeping. If you feel you are in a menial, repetitive job, is it because you’re not sufficiently skilled? Is there a training program available? Can you go back to school? Can you teach yourself a new skill? Does your company offer any training incentives? Is there a job within your company that would make you happier and, if so, what is required to be competitive for it? Working toward a goal, either within your company or outside it, can reinvigorate that sense of accomplishment and challenge you have been lacking.

If your boss is the problem, there are also steps you can take. If you work for a large company, can you transfer to a different department or area? If not, is there a way to get on your boss’s “good side”? Perhaps they’re just as frustrated with the job as you are and together you might recommend some positive changes. Perhaps you can volunteer for a task or special assignment that they will appreciate? This might also make you more visible to higher level management in the company. If your work environment is unpleasant, or you have difficult coworkers, these same questions and suggestions apply.

If your job is consuming all your time, you may need to step back and ask yourself whether there is an alternative. For example, new attorneys are expected to work exorbitant hours in their first years; it’s part of the training process. The same goes for a doctor going through a residency. You might be on a project with a short deadline and need to devote a lot of time to it. Before jumping ship, ask yourself if this going to be a continual problem or a shorter term one? If the former, and the pace is not for you, it may be time to revisit what you want and see if there is some other position you might take. Can you afford to work part-time or take some time off to recharge? In today’s tough economic climate, many have been asked to do more with less. Perhaps it’s time to examine at all your tasks and assignments and decide which need to be put on the backburner, what you can delegate, and what you really need to pay attention to. Burning yourself out will only make you less effective in the years to come.

Finally, what about salary and recognition? In general, I have found if you move yourself from the “I hate my job” to the “I love my job” category, the raises and recognitions start reappearing. Focus on the other four areas of dissatisfaction, become the employee everyone loves to work with, and it will be hard for management not to notice you.

Love your job? Hate it with a passion?

Tell us why!

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