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5 Questions to Ask After the Offer

5 Questions to Ask After the Offer

Denene Brox / Monster Contributing Writer

3. How much change is in the works at your prospective company, and what kind?

Constant change at work can mean constant stress. Find out if there are any big changes coming, such as new processing systems or management, impending retirements or adoption of new procedures that still need to be ironed out. At the same time, remember that some of these transitions will have less effect on your position than others.

4. Which of my skills and experiences will I be able to use, and what will I learn?

Make sure your unique skills and talents will be used and that training and promotion are open in the future. When you decide to move on, you’ll want to have a new crop of experiences to sell to your next employer. Your goal is to perform well at work while constantly growing and learning

5. How many people have held the position in the past several years?

Knowing how many people have been in your job and why they left can offer you great insights. You’ll want to know if they were promoted or quit altogether. A steady stream of resignations may be a sign you could be reentering the job market soon.

“Five people held that job in one year before I came along,” Speros says of her early-career job. “All the others quit within two weeks, as did my successor, whom I trained. I quit after two months and nearly had a nervous breakdown before I left.”

While many of the reasons positions eventually become unfulfilling are unavoidable, such as hitting a plateau after repeatedly performing the same duties, job seekers should consider the ways a new position will advance them.

“It’s normal to eventually become dissatisfied in any job for a variety of reasons,” Jansen says. “What’s important is to face it, understand the root of the dissatisfaction and do something about it.”

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