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Mac vs. PC: Which Works Best for Your Office?

Mac vs. PC: Which Works Best for Your Office?

Steve Berman | NonProfitPeople

Mac vs. PC: Functionality

Apple boasts that their computers are the easiest to use, most beautiful, most environmentally friendly, longest lasting — and the list goes on and on. Of course, you can also find gorgeous eco-friendly computers on the PC side as well, and taste is a big arbiter of what an individual will prefer in terms of visual aesthetics.

So what about the ease-of-use question? It’s actually trickier than Apple would like you to think. Since PCs make up the vast majority of computers throughout the world (which also means PC fans have an infinite number of choices, compared to relatively few for Mac users), most viruses are built to attack PCs. That doesn’t mean Mac users are out of the woods, but in general they face fewer threats from pesky hackers.

The sheer number of PCs out there is good for Microsoft: most people have never even used a Mac before. That might be tough to imagine for those who can’t go a minute without checking their iPhone, but the majority of people who use computers have been using PCs all their lives. And unless you’re a real technophile, change can be scary when it comes to computers.

One area where Apple’s marketing team took aim at the PCs that run Microsoft software was the operating systems each used. But that gap has narrowed quite a bit since Microsoft upgraded to Windows 7 from the buggy Windows Vista. Still, Macs are by far the computer of choice for those working in the publishing, design and art worlds.

While the lack of viruses may be an inherently unfair advantage for Macs, one that isn’t is battery life. Macs can often run for eight hours or more on one charge, while the same can hardly be said for PCs. For example, I can’t even use my Compaq on a plane flight — the battery dies less than an hour after being unplugged.

Summary: While Apple fans will gloat that their Macs don’t break as often or to the degree that PCs do, there haven’t been any studies that show this to be the case across the board. Apple’s desktop operating system has a more intuitive feel, but for those used to PCs, sticking with what they know is often the best option. In short, with PCs you get what you pay for, and with Macs it’s easier to know what you’re getting (although the initial cost might seem like more).

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